Stage devised a method to overcome the lack

Stage 1: Pre-field InvestigationThe aim of this Geographical investigation is to investigate the quality of water at different sites in different parks, with the goal of proving that the presence of different factors in the surrounding environment will affect the quality of water in the parks.The inquiry question for this investigation is how does the surrounding environment affect the quality of water. My hypothesis is that the larger the amount of human interaction in the surrounding environment, the lower the quality of water. The 2 parks investigated were Springleaf Nature Park and Macritchie Reservoir Park.The different factors in the surrounding environment that were investigated include:The amount of traffic (Eg. Cars, motorcycles, buses, trains)The amount of human activityThe types of human activityTo collect data on quality of water, we would first choose 2 sites from each park that differed from each other in terms of amount of human activity and traffic in the surrounding environment. Then, at each site, we collected 1 sample of water, approximately every 15 minutes, over the course of an hour. Each sample contained about 20 ml of water. To collect water, we would use the clear plastic cups to scoop the water. After collecting the sample, we carried out testing on site, to test the quality of water.Determining the quality of water was based off 3 factors: the turbidity of the water, the pH level of the water, and the weight of the residue in the water.Firstly, turbidity. To measure turbidity accurately, a turbidimeter is needed. 2However, the cheapest, proper turbidimeter I could find on the internet was at least SGD$1,000, which is too expensive to purchase. As such, we devised a method to overcome the lack of a turbidimeter. Since turbidity, as defined by the USGS, “can make water appear cloudy or muddy, is caused by the presence of suspended and dissolved matter, such as clay, silt, finely divided organic matter, plankton and other microscopic organisms, organic acids, and dyes.”, the main measure of turbidity would be the amount of light that can pass through the liquid. Thus, to measure turbidity, we would shine the torch light from an iPhone 6s from the bottom of the cup, then use a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 to take a picture from above the cup. While this method won’t have results in a definite unit of turbidity, we were then able to place the different pictures side by side and compare which picture was brighter. Secondly, determining the pH level of the water. For this, we went to Guardian to buy a box of universal indicator paper, which had a range of pH1 – pH11. Photo 1The universal indicator litmus paper we purchased and usedAfter performing the tests for turbidity, we would then proceed to insert one strip of the universal indicator paper into the water sample for 3 seconds, and then remove it. We would then compare the color shown on the wet end of the strip to the guide on the 3back of the box to determine the pH level of the water sample. Lastly, measuring the weight of the residue in the water. First, we would filter out the residue from the water using a filter cup. This filter cup was an improvisation we made as we were unable to acquire filter paper. The filter cup was created by using a safety pin to poke holes into the bottom of a plastic cup, which would allow the water to drip out but not the residue. Once we had filtered out the water, using this weighing scale,Photo 2The weighing scale used for the investigationWe would measure the weight of the cup and the residue. We had already measured the weight of the empty plastic cup to be 10g. Then, we would use the weight of the cup + residue, minus the weight of the cup to get the weight of residue.4Empty sample of recording sheet:Photo 3Empty recording sheet List of equipment used:Clear plastic cupsMetal pole and pailUniversal indicator litmus paperSafety pinWeighing scaleiPhone 6s (For its torchlight function)Samsung Galaxy Note 3 (For its camera function)5Stage 2: Field InvestigationHere are a few photos from the investigation:Photos 4, 5, 6, and 7Photos of the team at the site6Photos 8 and 9Maps of Macritchie park and Springleaf park respectivelyTabulated dataSpringleaf park7Macritchie park8Stage 3: Post-Field InvestigationDataWeight of empty plastic cup = 20gGraph 1 – Data from Macritchie park, site AGraph 2 – Data from Macritchie park, site B9Graph 3 – Data from Springleaf park, site AGraph 4 – Data from Springleaf park, site B10Turbidity:Macritchie park – Site APhotos 10, 11, 12, and 13Samples 1, 2,3 and 4 in the top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right respectively11Macritchie park – Site BPhotos 22, 23, 24, and 25Samples 1, 2,3 and 4 in the top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right respectively12Springleaf park – Site APhotos 14, 15, 16 and 17Samples 1, 2,3 and 4 in the top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right respectively13Springleaf park – Site BPhotos 18, 19, 20, and 21Samples 1, 2,3 and 4 in the top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right respectively14Analysis of dataFrom the data, it can be seen that my hypothesis, that the larger the amount of human interaction in the surrounding environment, the lower the quality of water, is in fact correct, however to a small extent. First, we will compare the 2 different sites within Macritchie park., site A, which has more human activity, and site B, which has less human activity. The three measures of quality of water used in this investigation are turbidity, pH level and weight of residue. Comparing the data from site A and B, it can be seen that site B generally has a better quality of water. The pH level of the samples at both sites are mostly pH 5, except for one anomaly at site B which has pH 6. This is most likely because the water at site B is slightly less acidic than the water at site A, due to the lack of human interaction. For the weight of residue, site A had an average of 2.5g of residue, while site B had an average of 2g of residue. This shoCitation listWebsiteUSGS – U.S. Geological Survey Office of Water Quality. “6.7 Turbidity.” USGS Water-Quality Information: 6.7 Turbidity, water.usgs.gov/owq/FieldManual/Chapter6/6.7_contents.html

x

Hi!
I'm Harold!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out